APARTMENT DEVELOPMENT IN AUSTRALIA

How to obtain quality, sustainable &

affordable apartments.

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ABOUT APARTMENT DEVELOPMENT

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Why can't speculative development give us the housing we want?

In this introduction to speculative apartment development, a brief explanation of the development process is provided; why it cannot provide quality, sustainability AND affordability; and highlights two innovations that create positive change.

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Deliberative Development (long version)

This video introduces 'deliberative development' or citizen led development as an alternative to speculative development and features Tim Riley, founder of Property Collectives and Dan Demant who with friends and family developed their own townhouses.

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The speculative apartment development process

This short animation provides more detail about the development process, highlighting some of the problems that result in speculative apartment development being unable to deliver quality+sustainability+affordability.

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Tim Riley from Property Collectives talks deliberative development

Hear more from Tim Riley,  the founder of Property Collectives and Dan Demant, Architect with Six Degrees Architects.

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Deliberative Development (short version)

This video introduces 'deliberative development' or citizen led development as an alternative to speculative development.

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How a matching market for apartments can overcome some of the problems

Finding and retaining presales is a significant challenge for the speculative process. Technology means we have a new way of overcoming the problem with benefits to developers and buyers!

ABOUT

https://www.rmit.edu.au/contact/staff-contacts/academic-staff/s/sharam-dr-andrea

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5506-6961

 

Dr Sharam is a national housing expert and researcher with an interest in:

  • market-based apartment development

  • non-market housing models (such as deliberative development, land trusts, cooperatives, non-profit housing and community housing)

  • matching in housing markets.

 

Selected publications

Sharam, A. (2020). Deliberative development: Australia's Baugruppen movement and the challenge of greater social inclusion In: Housing Studies, 35, 107 - 122

Sharam, A. (2019). Disruption and the matching market for new multi-family housing in Melbourne, Australia In: Journal of General Management, 44, 160 - 169

Sharam, A.,Byford, M.,Karabay, B.,McNelis, S.,Burke, T. (2018). Matching markets in housing and housing assistance In: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute Melbourne, Australia

Sharam, A.,Bryant, L. (2017). The uberisation of housing markets: Putting theory into practice In: Property Management, 35, 202 - 216

Sharam, A.,Bryant, L.,Alves, T. (2015). Identifying the financial barriers to deliberative, affordable apartment development in Australia In: International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, 8, 471 - 483

 

Sharam, A.,Stone, W.,Moran, M.,Findlay, S.,Mason, C. (2018). Understanding opportunities for social impact investment in the development of affordable housing In: Australian Housing & Urban Research Institute Melbourne, Australia

 

OTHER PROJECTS

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Matching markets in can overcome other housing problems

Housing is often assumed to be a commodity market, with only price differentiating dwellings. However, housing is in fact a matching market, as people seek to be paired with a home with the criteria for matching often highly specific and requiring reciprocity.

Issues with searching and high costs mean that matching markets do not always work well. However, the internet and technology is improving the viability and function of these markets.

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Finding accessible housing if you are a person living with disability (case example)

People living with disability  have little accessible housing to choose from. The first problem is even if mandated standards are adopted, new housing contributes a fraction of overall housing. Secondly,

there is no way of identifying what housing is accessible and to what extent it is accessible.

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Swaps and chain letting in social housing in Australia (case example)

Social housing tenant mobility is constrained by the difficulties in finding another tenant to swap with. Improving tenants mobility contributes positively to health, caring and employment outcomes.

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Affordable private rental housing (case example)

Housing is often assumed to be a commodity market, with only price differentiating dwellings. However, housing is in fact a matching market, as people seek to be paired with a home with the criteria for matching often highly specific and requiring reciprocity.

Issues with searching and high costs mean that matching markets do not always work well. However, the internet and technology is improving the viability and function of these markets.

 

CONTACT

Tel: 61+3 99251439

andrea.sharam@rmit.edu.au

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Andrea Sharam

School of Property, Construction & Project Management RMIT University

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